Malda Khirsapati (Himsagar) Mango

One of the most sinfully sweet and flavoursome mangoes of Malda is the famous Himsagar. Locally known as Khirsapati, this native mango thrives in the district of Malda especially along the banks of the Mahanadi and Kalindi rivers where, the entire stretch is dotted with old and new orchards appearing as an unbroken expanse of... Continue Reading →

Navaratna Gopal Lakshmi Janardan Temple, Ghurisha Village, Illambazar Block, Birbhum District, West Bengal

The charming village of Ghurisha, once an important seat of Sanskrit and literature is dotted with many fine examples of terracotta temples built in the traditional Bengali style of chala and ratna. The temples of Ghurisha and surrounding villages have been documented at length by Mukul Dey of Shantiniketan and David McCutchion.     One... Continue Reading →

Jora Bangla Durga Temple, Bali Dewanganj, Hooghly District, West Bengal

The Durga Temple in the quaint village of Bali Deewanganj (widely believed to be two villages - Bali and Deewanganj) is one of a kind temple harmoniously incorporating two distinctive styles of Bengali temple architecture namely the chala (hut type roof) and the ratna (pinnacle). This temple has captured the interest of architects, historians and heritage enthusiasts for... Continue Reading →

Gobindabhog Rice of West Bengal

Archaeological excavations conducted in 1962 at Pandu Rajar Dhibi in Ausgram II block in the Sadar North subdivision of Purba Bardhaman district in West Bengal unearthed earthen pots using a mix of rice husk in the main mound. Based on scientific tests, archaeologists concluded that the ancient civilization that dates back to 2000 BCE was... Continue Reading →

Malda Fazli Mango

The historically important Malda district is famous for its jute, mulberry plantations and wide range of mangoes. Some of the most exotic and delicious mangoes of India like Laxman Bhog, Khirsapati (Himsagar), Aswini and of course Fazli thrive in this stretch of land that runs along the banks of the Mahananda and Kalindi rivers.  ... Continue Reading →

Santipore Saree of West Bengal

One of the most exquisite weaves in cotton and silk is found in the Bengal heartland of Shantipur - Phulia. Called as Shantipuri, this centuries-old tant (traditional Bengali saree) derives its name from Shantipur in Nadia district. The ancient handloom industry in Shantipur has been mentioned in manuscripts glorifying the life of Advaita Acharya as... Continue Reading →

Dhaniakhali Saree of West Bengal

One of the most beloved traditional handloom sarees of West Bengal is Dhaniakhali saree deriving its name from the place Dhaniakhali in Chinsurah subdivision in Hooghly district. Hooghly district is home to some of the oldest cottage industries like silk and cotton handloom weaving, brass and bell metal manufacturing, oil pressing, village tanning and others.... Continue Reading →

Madur kathi, West Bengal

Medinipur or Midnapore, considered to be one of the largest districts of West Bengal after independence is rich with ancient history, archaeological sites, culture and heritage that is deeply influenced by the royal families. It is home to some of the oldest crafts that date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. One among them is... Continue Reading →

Wooden Mask of Kushmandi, West Bengal

The quaint village of Mahisbathan in Kushmandi district in the heritage belt of Dakshin Dinajpur is famous for its unique wooden masks. The origin of this craft of mask making is unknown but the stylization, designs and motifs of the masks suggests a deep connection to their religious beliefs. These masks are an intrinsic part... Continue Reading →

Tulaipanji Rice of West Bengal

Dinajpur district in West Bengal is renowned for its indigenous rice diversity finding mention in many important scriptural texts dating back to 1100 CE One of the oldest native varieties found here is Tulaipanji or Tulai that has been cultivated for centuries with traditional methods. Folk songs glorifying this scented rice, its cultivation practices and... Continue Reading →

Joynagar Moa of West Bengal

The ancient city of Joynagar-Majilpur derives its name from the local goddess and presiding deity, Ma Joychandi and over time, came to be called Joychandinagar and then Joynagar. Joyangar is popularly known as 'the cradle of moa', a unique winter sweet that is placed in high esteem by Bengalis.     It is said that... Continue Reading →

Baluchari Saree of West Bengal

The history of Baluchari that literally means sandy river bank can be traced back to 1704 C.E. when Murshid Quli Khan, the Nawab of Bengal who patronized the flourishing weaving tradition brought several weavers from Dhaka in Bangladesh and helped them establish a small weaving community in Baluchar village on the bank of the Bhagirathi... Continue Reading →

Rasmancha, Bishnupur, Bankura District, West Bengal

The long-established tradition of rasa leela (Dance of Divine Love) has been prevalent in West Bengal for centuries. This auspicious occasion is either celebrated on Krishna Janmashtami or on Kartik Purnima where Lord Krishna is brought from different temples and placed on a viewing pavilion called rasmancha or dolmancha. One of the most famous rasmancha is the Rasmancha at... Continue Reading →

Bardhaman Sitabhog of West Bengal

The lip-smacking Sitabhog served with nikhuti (tiny gulab jamuns) will assuredly send you to a heavenly place! This century-old sweet of Bardhaman along with Mihidana is an invention of the late Khettranath Nag. The city of Bardhaman derives it name from Mahavira or Vardhaman Swami (around the 6th century B.C.E.) and is famous for its... Continue Reading →

Bardhaman Mihidana of West Bengal

The delectable Bardhaman Mihidana that literally means fine grains was first prepared along with Sitabhog in honour of Maharaja Mahtab Chand Bahadur by the late Khettranath Nag according to his grandson, the late Nagendranath Nag. Seventy-two years later, both these dishes were served to Lord Curzon in 1904 when he visited Bardhaman on the invitation... Continue Reading →

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