भागलपुरी जर्दालू आम (Bhagalpuri Zardalu Mango, Bihar)

हालांकि भागलपुर के जर्दालू आम का उल्लेख भारत की उच्च कोटि की आम की श्रेणियों जैसे: दशहरी, लंगड़ा, हापुज में कहीं नहीं पाया जाता, परंतु इस सौंधी खुशबू वाले आम को अब धीरे धीरे वह पहचान मिल रही है, जिसका यह अधिकारी है। असल में, जर्दालू आम का अपना रोचक इतिहास है, कहा जाता है... Continue Reading →

महाराष्ट्र का लासलगाव प्याज़ (Lasalgaon Onion, Maharashtra)

नाशिक जिले के निफाड तालुक में स्थित लासलगाव न केवल भारत अपितु समस्त एशिया में प्याज का सबसे बड़ा बाज़ार है। कई लोगों को इस बात का पता ही नहीं होगा कि महाराष्ट्र देश में प्याज का सबसे बड़ा उत्पादक है। प्रसिध्द लासलगाव प्याज़ जिसे लाल निफाड या नाशिक प्याज के नाम से भी जाना... Continue Reading →

आसाम की तेज़पुर लीची (Tezpur Litchi of Assam)

पूर्वोत्तर राज्य आसाम के बारे में शायद बहुत से लोग इस बात से अनजान हैं कि यह राज्य जैविक विविधता, विभिन्न वनस्पतियों और जीव जंतुओं से समृद्ध राज्य है। आसाम अपनी उष्णकटिबंधीय वर्षा वनों, बांस के बगीचों, राष्ट्रीय उद्यानों साथ ही विभिन्न प्रकार की स्थानीय खेती और फलों के उत्पादन के लिए भी जाना जाता... Continue Reading →

Puneri Pagadi, Maharashtra

Pagadi or turban has historically been a sign of culture, wisdom, virility and often used identify the different sections of community. Puneri pagadi is an inseparable part of Pune which is the cultural capital of Maharashtra.   Puneri pagadi is conceptualized from the Peshwe turban worn by the Peshwas which itself was inspired by the traditional Chakribandh... Continue Reading →

Waghya Ghevada, Maharashtra

One of the most famous cash crops of Western Maharashtra is Waghya ghevada. Grown extensively in North Koregaon taluka of Satara district, this rajma was first cultivated in 1950 by the late Kashinath Mahajan who bought seeds of this variety from a trader in Pune. This variety soon became popular with the locals and was... Continue Reading →

Sindhudurg and Ratnagiri Kokum, Maharashtra

Kokum (Garcinia indica) called as the ‘The Kool King’ of Indian fruits flourishes in the dense forests of the Western Ghats of Maharashtra. Konkan kokum is a perennial fruit of commercial value that thrives in the scenic Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg districts.   According to the locals, Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg districts have about 43,000 centuries-old kokum... Continue Reading →

Swamimalai Bronze Icons of Tamil Nadu

Shilpa Shastra, broadly classified as the 'Science of Arts and Crafts' is the supreme authority on the Chatushashti Kalas (Sixty-four arts) of the universe. The subject of Shilpa Shastra is dealt with at length in the Vedas, Puranas, Agamas and others scriptures and has been assiduously adopted by kings, craftsmen and patrons of art since time immemorial.... Continue Reading →

Wooden Mask of Kushmandi, West Bengal

The quaint village of Mahisbathan in Kushmandi district in the heritage belt of Dakshin Dinajpur is famous for its unique wooden masks. The origin of this craft of mask making is unknown but the stylization, designs and motifs of the masks suggests a deep connection to their religious beliefs. These masks are an intrinsic part... Continue Reading →

Tulaipanji Rice of West Bengal

Dinajpur district in West Bengal is renowned for its indigenous rice diversity finding mention in many important scriptural texts dating back to 1100 CE One of the oldest native varieties found here is Tulaipanji or Tulai that has been cultivated for centuries with traditional methods. Folk songs glorifying this scented rice, its cultivation practices and... Continue Reading →

Joynagar Moa of West Bengal

The ancient city of Joynagar-Majilpur derives its name from the local goddess and presiding deity, Ma Joychandi and over time, came to be called Joychandinagar and then Joynagar. Joyangar is popularly known as 'the cradle of moa', a unique winter sweet that is placed in high esteem by Bengalis.     It is said that... Continue Reading →

Baluchari Saree of West Bengal

The history of Baluchari that literally means sandy river bank can be traced back to 1704 C.E. when Murshid Quli Khan, the Nawab of Bengal who patronized the flourishing weaving tradition brought several weavers from Dhaka in Bangladesh and helped them establish a small weaving community in Baluchar village on the bank of the Bhagirathi... Continue Reading →

Pattamadai Pai (Pattamadai Mats) of Tamil Nadu

The quaint village of Pattamadai in Tirunelveli district in Tamil Nadu is famous for its centuries-old handwoven mats made of korai grass. These exquisite mats found its place on the international market when it was gifted to Queen Elizabeth II on her coronation in 1953 and since then has been presented to dignitaries around the world.... Continue Reading →

Rasmancha, Bishnupur, Bankura District, West Bengal

The long-established tradition of rasa leela (Dance of Divine Love) has been prevalent in West Bengal for centuries. This auspicious occasion is either celebrated on Krishna Janmashtami or on Kartik Purnima where Lord Krishna is brought from different temples and placed on a viewing pavilion called rasmancha or dolmancha. One of the most famous rasmancha is the Rasmancha at... Continue Reading →

Bardhaman Sitabhog of West Bengal

The lip-smacking Sitabhog served with nikhuti (tiny gulab jamuns) will assuredly send you to a heavenly place! This century-old sweet of Bardhaman along with Mihidana is an invention of the late Khettranath Nag. The city of Bardhaman derives it name from Mahavira or Vardhaman Swami (around the 6th century B.C.E.) and is famous for its... Continue Reading →

Bardhaman Mihidana of West Bengal

The delectable Bardhaman Mihidana that literally means fine grains was first prepared along with Sitabhog in honour of Maharaja Mahtab Chand Bahadur by the late Khettranath Nag according to his grandson, the late Nagendranath Nag. Seventy-two years later, both these dishes were served to Lord Curzon in 1904 when he visited Bardhaman on the invitation... Continue Reading →

Chettinad Kottan of Tamil Nadu

Once a part of the kingdom of the Pandyas of Madurai, Chettinadu or the land of Chettiars comprised of 96 villages founded by the Nattukottai Chettiars or Nagarthar meaning townsfolk. This aristocratic community were seafarers, bankers and businessmen. This wealthy stretch of land in Sivaganga district is famous for its architecture, art, utensils, tiles, weaving and... Continue Reading →

Kakramath Temple, Mahoba, Uttar Pradesh

Another legacy of the glorious reign of the Chandelas in Mahoba is the stunning Kakramath temple in the middle of Madan Sagar. Kakramath temple is widely considered by architects, historians and artists to be an exceptional structure made entirely of the famous Mahoba granite.   This temple is believed to have been built in the... Continue Reading →

Mangalwedha Jowar of Maharashtra

Popularly known as the 'Land of Saints', Mangalwedha taluka in Solapur district is renowned for its culture, heritage and agricultural produce. Traditional crops like sorghum, bajra, groundnuts, corn and sugarcane cultivated in this historical place has been famous for centuries. The local variety of jowar known as Maldandi jowar has been cultivated here for at... Continue Reading →

Uttarakhand Ringal Craft

Ringal is a socioeconomically and ecologically important type of bamboo that is extensively found in the rich forests of Garhwal Himalayas. Ringal or ningaw as it is locally known is considered by the local communities to be an important resource for their livelihood. Ringal weaving is an age-old craft of Uttarakhand with almost every family directly... Continue Reading →

Chamba Chappal of Himachal Pradesh

The picturesque town of Chamba named after the devout royal princess of Bharmour, Champavati is situated on the banks of the river Ravi at an elevation of about 926 feet. Historians say that Chamba was known as Airavati in the ancient times. There are very few places in the world that can rival its stunning... Continue Reading →

Ajaigarh Fort, Ajaigarh, Panna District, Madhya Pradesh

Ajaigarh located south-east of Mahoba, south-west of Kalinjar and north-east of Khajuraho formed the formidable quadrilateral seats of power, religion, art and architecture of the Chandelas. Ajaigarh is said to have been derived from the word Jaya-pura-durga which then became Jaya-garh as seen in some inscriptions found in Jaipur. This historical city was established by the... Continue Reading →

Varanasi Glass Beads of Uttar Pradesh

The ancient city of Varanasi is one of the major centres of glass beads also known as kaanch ke moti. Historians say that glass has been used since ancient times and many archaeological excavations have unearthed glass pieces and crucibles that are over thousands of years old in different parts of Uttar Pradesh. Besides this,... Continue Reading →

Mirzapur Handmade Dari of Uttar Pradesh

Mirzapur in Varanasi district in Uttar Pradesh is one of the oldest and most important areas of dari weaving in the country. This belt that stretches across Bhadohi, Varanasi, Ghazipur, Sonbhadra, Kaushambi, Prayagraj, Jaunpur and Chandauli districts represents the largest concentration of dari weavers in India. The whole process of Mirzapur handmade dari is labour... Continue Reading →

Mahoba Desawari Paan of Uttar Pradesh

The historical city of Mahoba in Bundelkhand, once known as Mahotsav Nagar was the stronghold of the Chandelas and Pratiharas. In the ninth century, the Chandela king ordered a betel vine from Udaipur - Banswara in Rajasthan and planted it in the western part of Gorakhgiri. The westerly and southerly winds at Bundelkhand are warmer... Continue Reading →

Kanniyakumari Clove of Tamil Nadu

Tamil Nadu is the largest producer of clove in the country with Kanyakumari district contributing a sizeable portion to the total production.  Clove was introduced in India around the 1800s by the East India Company in its spice garden in Courtallam. The dense wooded areas of Maramalai, Karumparai and Vellimalai in the Western Ghats of... Continue Reading →

Shankaragaurishvara Temple, Pattan, Baramulla District, Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir

Shankaragaurishvara Temple in Pattan is an exemplary example of Kashmiri temple style architecture prevalent in the 9th century. Modern Pattan is actually Shankarapattana, the capital founded by Shankaravarman of Utpala dynasty. Both Shankaravarman and his father Avantivarman were patrons of art, architecture and Sanskrit literature. Their noteworthy contribution to the revival of Hindu philosophy and... Continue Reading →

Sangli Turmeric of Maharashtra

Sangli located in the western part of Maharashtra is considered to be the largest and most important trading centre for turmeric in Asia. Popularly known as the 'Saffron City', Sangli has been cultivating its world-famous turmeric since the 1900s. It is said that large quantities of Sangli turmeric used to be exported through the Rajapur... Continue Reading →

Hatu Mata Mandir, Narkanda, Himachal Pradesh

Hatu Peak at a staggering elevation of 11,152 feet (3400 metres) is the highest peak in Shimla district in Himachal Pradesh. A narrow treacherous single road, a little away from Narkanda passing through dense forests of deodar, fir, spruce, blue pine and others on one side and a dizzying fall into a valley below leads... Continue Reading →

Hathei Chilli of Manipur

Hathei chilli or umoruk as it is called in the local dialect is considered to be God's gift and the pride of Ukhrul for the people of Sirarakhong. This special chilli along with the seven other organically grown varieties of chilli in Manipur have been cultivated for generations. Hathei chilli thrives only in the Mahadev... Continue Reading →

Malinithan, Likabali, Arunachal Pradesh

The ancient town of Malinithan situated at the foothills of the Siang Hills in Likabali is steeped in religion, history, culture and architecture. Legend has it that when Lord Krishna kidnapped Rukmini Devi, they passed this beautiful location on their way to Dwaraka from Vidarbha. They found Lord Shiva and Parvathi Devi deep in tapas in... Continue Reading →

Rataul Mango of Uttar Pradesh

The Rataul mango was discovered by the renowned mango aficionado, Sheikh Mohammed Afaq Faridi (grandson of the late Abdur Razzak who cultivated the first mangoes in Rataul in the late 1800s) while taking a stroll in a farm. Sheikh Mohammed Afaq Faridi was so passionate about mangoes that he could tell the variety just by... Continue Reading →

Naga Cucumber

Cucumber is said to have been cultivated by many indigenous communities in India for more than 3,000 years. Cucumber has been grown by tribals in Nagaland for centuries. It is one of the most important crops of the North Eastern states and Nagaland ranks fifth in area under cultivation and third in production.   The... Continue Reading →

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